Keynote speakers

Workshop on Efficient, Intelligent and Economic

District Heating and Cooling Systems

 

IEEE SmartGridComm Conference

6 November 2016, Sydney Australia

The OPTi project has received funding from the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme of the European Union under grant number 649796

The Storm project has received funding from the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme of the European Union under grant number 649743

Dr Jonas Gustafsson

Operations Manager

SICS NorthSwedish ICT

 

 

Datacenters as heat plants, opportunities and challenges

 

With an ever increasing data generation, flow and storage, more and more energy is required to power the communication infrastructure and datacenters that serves us with the information that we, and the increasing amount of smart devices need. Utilizing the heat generated in datacenters for heating district heating systems is seen as a major possibility to capture the otherwise often useless heat produced in the datacenters.

 

In this presentation I will present the some of the technical challenges with increasing datacenter waste heat temperature and approaches to overcome them. I will also present ideas and open up for discussion on how to reduce the temperature need for existing district heating systems, without re-designing the complete system. I will finalize my presentation with some words on our new large-scale research- and test-datacenter, SICS ICE.

 

Dr Guillermo A Narsilio

Australian Research Council “Future Fellow” and Senior Lecturer

University of Melbourne

 

Geothermal Energy: Overview and challenges of introducing an emerging technology

 

Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems efficiently heat and cool buildings using sustainable geothermal energy accessed via ground heat exchangers (GHEs). In closed loop systems, GHEs comprise pipes embedded in specifically drilled boreholes or trenches or even built into foundations, all within a few tens of metres from the surface. Given that GSHP systems operate at a coefficient of performance of about 4, the substitution of commonly used electrical heating and cooling systems with geothermal systems could significantly reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, even more so when planned for district heating and/or cooling. This keynote presents an overview of the principles of the technology and the various factors that affect GHE performance and consequently the capital and operating costs of these systems.